Dean Jones: An Investigation into the Use of Modern Methods of Construction in UK Home Building. London South Bank University, 2009.

Abstract

This dissertation analysis the perceived benefits of Modern Methods of Construction (MMC), which if viable could be said to provide the solution to more affordable, better quality, cost-effective and environmentally friendly housing in the UK.

The paper investigates the recent background to MMC home building, setting the historical and social context by identifying key relating papers, government’s bodies and initiatives. The government’s 60K home, Design for Manufacture Competition (DfMC) was regarded as fundamental milestone because, the government claimed that it succeeded in producing affordable, better quality, cost-effective and environmentally friendly housing using MMC. It was highlighted as a key driver for the start of the wider use of the term MMC.

Previous papers and projects, which addressed the benefits of MMC prior to the DfMC were analysed to establish the theoretical propositions made.

The study investigated and produced detailed case studies for three of the ten DfMC schemes and a questionnaire. It used the data from the case studies and collected from the surveys to make practical comparisons with the developed theoretical benefits of MMC.

Some of the case study and survey results are substantially different from the theoretical benefits and that of those reported by the government following the launch of their DfMC. Whilst only speed of construction was highlighted as a factual MMC benefit over traditional methods of house building, a number of steps are still required to realise this benefit in reality.

The results are shown in the conclusion of the work, which will hopefully enable future projects to consider MMC within their business case in a more unambiguous way.

BibTeX (Download)

@mastersthesis{Jones2009,
title = {An Investigation into the Use of Modern Methods of Construction in UK Home Building},
author = {Dean Jones},
url = {https://godinterest.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/An-Investigation-into-the-use-of-Modern-Methods-of-Construction-in-UK-Home-Building-2009.pdf},
year  = {2009},
date = {2009-06-01},
pages = {108},
address = {103 Borough Rd, London SE1 0AA},
school = {London South Bank University},
abstract = {This dissertation analysis the perceived benefits of Modern Methods of Construction (MMC), which if viable could be said to provide the solution to more affordable, better quality, cost-effective and environmentally friendly housing in the UK.

The paper investigates the recent background to MMC home building, setting the historical and social context by identifying key relating papers, government’s bodies and initiatives. The government’s 60K home, Design for Manufacture Competition (DfMC) was regarded as fundamental milestone because, the government claimed that it succeeded in producing affordable, better quality, cost-effective and environmentally friendly housing using MMC. It was highlighted as a key driver for the start of the wider use of the term MMC.

Previous papers and projects, which addressed the benefits of MMC prior to the DfMC were analysed to establish the theoretical propositions made.

The study investigated and produced detailed case studies for three of the ten DfMC schemes and a questionnaire. It used the data from the case studies and collected from the surveys to make practical comparisons with the developed theoretical benefits of MMC.

Some of the case study and survey results are substantially different from the theoretical benefits and that of those reported by the government following the launch of their DfMC. Whilst only speed of construction was highlighted as a factual MMC benefit over traditional methods of house building, a number of steps are still required to realise this benefit in reality.

The results are shown in the conclusion of the work, which will hopefully enable future projects to consider MMC within their business case in a more unambiguous way.
},
keywords = {Construction, Design},
pubstate = {published},
tppubtype = {mastersthesis}
}