Have We Got It All Wrong About Christmas?

Halloween is over, Thanksgiving is just around the corner, and so begins the countdown to Christmas.

3 Challenging Thoughts about Christmas
3 Challenging Thoughts about Christmas

The story of Christmas is a good passage to meditate on at any time of the year; but yes, most especially around the Christmas season. Passages like Luke 2: 1-20 gives us insights about a lot of things. It actually challenges our way of life and thinking in a number of ways.

Christianity is not about recognition or fame.

did not come as a celebrity. All throughout the Gospels we see a , a Messiah who did not come for fame nor recognition. He was mostly low-key. He never showcased His power. He displayed it to perform miracles that directly served a purpose and met a need. This tells us that there is more to life than worldly achievements and preoccupations. Knowing this challenges us that as was more interested in making a difference in the spiritual and internal conditions of man, so should we. Earthly responsibilities and obligations must be met. But we ought to make sure that doing Kingdom work is part of our regular routines.

Christianity is always inclusive.

The primary characters in the narrative were common people. Christ’s earthly parents were a carpenter and an ordinary girl who had average standing in society. Luke 2:24 mentions what Mary offered a pair of turtledoves at the temple. According to the law, that was what poor people presented for purification offerings. Christ was first welcomed by worshippers who were shepherds by profession; a class of workers looked down by society in those days. Later on, Christ would call mere fishermen to take part in his earthly ministry.

From these we gather that God wanted to affirm his all-inclusive love and plan of salvation for all. That He made connections and paid attention to the lowest “ranks" of society tells us that God excludes no one. 2 Peter 3:9 says He is never willing that any should perish but that all should come to know Christ as Savior of mankind. This challenges us to try to reach all sorts of people for Him. As God thought of all people so should we. Even the most unlovable person is loved by Him. Even the cruelest, evilest, most incorrigible person is loved by Him. Though we are unable to extend love as supremely as God does, we can love people enough to pray for salvation and enlightenment to dawn on their lives. In fact, the best way to get rid of your enemies is to pray for them to get saved and be changed by the saving and transforming power of the Holy Spirit.

Christianity is always about giving.

God gave, God gives, and He will keep giving. His giving never stops. Our receiving will never end. All mankind are recipients of God’s benefits each and every day, whether people acknowledge and thank Him or not. It is God who gives us the ability and strength to perform tasks and accomplish things. (Deut. 8:18). It is God who blesses us with daily needs and sustenance. Our very need for the sun is supplied by Him. (Matthew 5:45). It is God who adds days to our lives. (Job 12:10). Knowing all these challenges us to try to be more giving in life and to afford grace to others even when they may not deserve it. When we nurture a giving heart, we become more understanding and more forgiving towards people. We become blessers instead of hoarders. We become content with what we have and become more purposeful with our spending. We become less selfish and less self-absorbed. We become more appreciative of life and people.

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Chris
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Chris Duffett posted some great thoughts on Christmas and what it's all about. Well worth a look. https://chrisduffett.com/2018/11/21/jesus-wasnt-born-on-the-25th-december-in-fact-he-wasnt-even-born-in-december-does-it-matter/

Ronald Thomas
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The Spirit of God dwells within all of us, Gen. 1:2, the gifts we give is charity but we do not mix the Spirit of God with other gods like it says let the dead bury the dead, there is a morality and precepts of the Old Testament that are still in effect. The giving of gifts does not include money as everyone thinks. The Roman Catholic Church used a pagan holiday to disavow the Spirit of Christ in the Jewish Religion around 325 AD at the council of Nicea.

Ronald Thomas
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The Spirit of God dwells within all of us, Gen. 1:2, the gifts we give is charity but we do not mix the Spirit of God with other gods like it says let the dead bury the dead, there is a morality and precepts of the Old Testament that are still in effect. The giving of gifts does not include money as everyone thinks. The Roman Catholic Church used a pagan holiday to disavow the Spirit of Christ in the Jewish Religion around 325 AD at the council of Nicea.

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Written by Ana Menez

I serve with a training & equipping organization. I am also a freelance writer and I take great interest in writing and sharing growth resources. Reading is one of my great loves. I love it for all its fresh insights and points of view that help as I consider issues relevant to my faith life.

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